Showing posts with label copy blu-ray to mkv. Show all posts
Showing posts with label copy blu-ray to mkv. Show all posts

Friday, July 14, 2017

How to Rip Blu-Ray in the Right Way?

For a long time I have ripped my movies for home use and have been fighting through many different programs of swinging character and swinging prisms. Most functionally work for specific purposes or have the great advantage of being free, but no one can do all tasks as well. There are programs like Makemaker that makes MKV files of your DVDs but can not handle Blu-Ray, Pavtube iMedia Converter that manages Blu-Ray but not in lossless format or with multiple audio and subtitle or Handbrake that's free but Which can not combine sections on a Series DVD / Blu-Ray and is quite slow.

For a long time I have also experimented with file formats and found that MKV is just becoming?the most useful format in all respects, so this guide focuses on an end result in MKV.

Additionally, I am tired of having to install different software to handle the different discs I would like to rip and should remember the different settings and procedures for each program.

I have chosen that ByteCopy from Pavtube should be my favorite tool as it has some obvious benefits when it comes to ripping. You can rip Blu-Ray and DVD on 2 methods. Either as lossless copy or as a converted encoded file with a less natural quality loss, but more importantly you can select multiple audio and subtitle tracks and you can encode them individually in the entire file to match your hardware setup as best as possible.?I personally rarely use lossless as it takes too much and would like my Blu-Ray into a 4-5 GB file for network playback for my ATV4.

Pavtube ByteCopy

So what can ByteCopy do? It looks like many of the other programs on the market when it rips and copies Blu-ray Disc and DVD movies to MKV. ByteCopy plays an irreplaceable role as the exclusive Blu-ray ripper that converts the main movie on Blu-ray, audio tracks and subtitles exactly as you want without compromising video and audio quality. When it encoder and diminish Blu-ray content, CUDA acceleration is turned on by default whenever possible and it gives a significant boost in speed.

Export file format: MKV
Video: H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC, VC-1, MPEG pass-through; H.264, Xvid, MPEG, VC-1 encoded
Audio: Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, DTS Digital, DTS-HD High-Def, DTS-HD MA Pass-through; Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS, AAC, MP3 encoded.

Method 1

Step 1. Blu-ray rip in Lossless Mode, ie a rip of Blu-Ray main movie with all original video, audio and subtitle tracks without changing anything. For those who have a lot of disk space and who do not want to compromise on anything. Start ByteCopy and load your disk by clicking the DVD / Blu-Ray button. The movie is now loaded (copy protected or not) and the main movie is automatically selected, but everything can be selected. Useful if you have plenty of space.

Load Blu-ray movies

Step 2. Click the converter button to start riping your Blu-Ray to MKV, with the main file, all audio and subtitle tracks. If you have finished ripping, you can click "Browse Export Path" to find the MKV file. TIP! You can change the output path under settings in the software. Then just wait

Start Blu-ray to MKV Ripping process

Under lossless (default) mode, Pavtube ByteCopy will convert Blu-ray movies to MKV without changing anything. All it takes is to rip the main movie file from the disk and pack it in an MKV container. You get lossless quality with all subtitles and audio tracks, because original video, audio and subtitles are preserved. In addition, you also keep chapter marks.

Method 2

Certainly the method I use most. It shreds the disc with the subtitles and audio tracks you want, while compressing the file to a somewhat more handy size without compromising on quality compromises. I will show you how to do this, but you can change the different parameters for what suits you best. I rip my movies for a setup with an NAS that streams to a jailbreaked ATV4 with Firecore media player installed. This gives the smallest file the exact content I want.

Step 1. Load the file from ByteCopy. The main movie is automatically selected.

Load Blu-ray movies

Step 2. Select the title in the window and click edit disk. You can now choose which audio tracks and subtitles you want. TIP! You can set your selection by default in ByteCopy's settings, so they are remembered each time. In addition, you can also select a specific player you want to rip to, so ByteCopy converts light and subtitles to file formats that are compatible with your player. I always use lossless and put my own choice of file types.

Select desired Blu-ray subtitles and audio tracks

Step 3. If it's only a specific part you want to rip (for example, only main), go directly to the selected track and click Title Settings. Here you can choose to rip in Full HD, or as I do just below HD. At Full HD, I recommend bitrate of 8000, at HD you can reach 6000. Is it a DVD you rip, then choose 720x576 in Size and you can beat a bitrate of around 2000. Remember to tick the Enco if you Will change the resolution and bitrate.

Customize video settings

Step 4. Next turn is the sound. I always start by clicking uncheck All, as I usually only want Danish and English audio. After checking the checkboxes you want, you can choose whether you want the Encode audio, or just keep it as it is in Source. I always keep it as ATV4?can handle DTSHD for a stereo TV speaker, but for some, it may be necessary to convert to a stereo track.

Remove unwanted audio tracks

Step 5. Then we are on subtitles. Again Unchecl All and select the subtitle (s) you want. I always choose Danish only, but some may want others too. When done, click OK, and click the MKV button to begin.

Remove unwanted subtitles

Then the task is created and ByteCopy starts calculating time and size based on your choices and the power of your computer. As you can see in the screenshots below, ByteCopy is quite accurate in its calculations, and only diverges a very small amount. The time you see listed is on a 2012 13 "Macbook Air, and I think it's quite good to be able to rip and compress / encode a Blu-Ray disc in less than 2 hours. Is it just a DVD, then we talk for half an hour.

Start Blu-ray movie copying process

ByteCopy is by far the best and fastest program I've tried. You can download a trial version from Pavtube, either ByteCopy for Windows or ByteCopy for Mac OS X. You can make 7 lossless rips with the trial and want to rip and encode to get a watermark on the movie. You can purchase the software for only $ 42 including unlimited lifetime upgrades. Enjoy.

Friday, March 7, 2014

Things you should know before ripping a Blu-ray to HD media player

When people rip Blu-ray for HD media player playback, they want the best quality, if possible, everything original. However, this is not a good idea. Not any HD media player can replace a Blu-ray Disc player so far. Even there are HD media player boxes that lets users to add a Blu-ray Disc drive (e.g. Popcorn Hour C-200), they do not give you full features. Normally you have main movie but lose the menus and special features, and this is called simple BD-navigation.

But most HD media players only read Medias from HDD. That’s why people need get Blu-rays ripped first. When ripping a Blu-ray to HDD, there are quite a lot of formats to save the movie to : ISO, BDMV, M2TS, MKV, and whatever video format you like. Many guys choose ISO because it keeps everything original of the Blu-ray movie. Well “everything original” includes the menus and features and some other files that your HD media player can not play. Without them you can save 3GB or more for a single Blu-ray movie.

And “everything original” also means the 1080p video of very high bitrate, up to 7.1-channels HD audio and PGS subtitles. Now the question is, can your HD media player decode TrueHD and DTS-HD codec? If not, can it pass-through them to an audio receiver that supports these codecs? If not again, you’ll have to down-mix them during Blu-ray ripping, say converting DTS-HD to Dolby Digital 5.1 audio or AAC stereo, otherwise you’ll watch a silent film…

If audio codec is not a problem for you, and you don’t care much about subtitles (captions), MakeMKV is your choice- it rips Blu-ray to MKV with main movie, original audio tracks and subtitles. And 30 days’ free trial. You wanna have subtitles displayed on HDTV when playing ripped Blu-ray? Choose ByteCopy then. It converts the PGS subtitles to DVD subtitle format, which is definitely acceptable by HD media players. It also lets you extract .srt subtitles for MKV file, including forced subtitles.

There is not a “best way for ripping Blu-ray”, as it depends on what media player and audio system you have. My advice is, check the specs of your devices before you backup a Blu-ray Disc to hard drive.

Read more:

How to watch DVD movies on TV/Laptop/Smartphone via Plex Media Server?
Playing Blu-ray with Popcorn Hour A-200 (BDMV/MKV/M2TS playback solutions)
How to stream Blu-ray movies to Popcorn Hour A-400 – Saving Blu-ray movies to NAS